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  • All the libraries I looked at seemed to provide a lot of components, and were under active development, however there were several problems I encountered with them: – – Therefore, given these difficulties, I decided I had to make my own graphing components instead.
  • Each component usually requires you to either pass it lots of properties, which determine everything about how the graph displays – whether to show the axes, data for the chart legend, and of course data for the graph itself.
  • This isn’t ideal, mainly because it gives you very little control over layout and styling, and you have to do this through the library’s own DSL (domain specific language) rather than using CSS.
  • For example, you can do this layout in CSS grid: – – This is very important, because it allows you to split a chart up into simpler and more focused components.
  • You’ll need 3 components: the X axis, Y axis, and the step area graph itself.

We recently released our latest open source library, ngx-graphs. It’s a collection of Angular graphing components, designed to be highly composable. It’s very much still in the alpha stage, and only supports 2 different types of graphs at the moment. In this blog post, I’ll discuss why we felt the need to create (yet another) graphing/charting library for Angular, and the overall aims of ngx-graphs.

We recently released our latest open source library, ngx-graphs. It’s a collection of Angular graphing components, designed to be highly composable. It’s very much still in the alpha stage, and only supports 2 different types of graphs at the moment. In this blog post, I’ll discuss why we felt the need to create (yet another) graphing/charting library for Angular, and the overall aims of .

We were recently working on an Angular project that needed to display a visualisation of a value over time, and we decided to use a step area chart for this. When I started writing the app, I had a look at what charting libraries were available for Angular. I found there were already several popular libraries, such as ngx-charts and ng2-charts. All the libraries I looked at seemed to provide a lot of components, and were under active development, however there were several problems I encountered with them:

Therefore, given these difficulties, I decided I had to make my own graphing components instead. Once these components were complete, and we’d done some dogfooding with them, we open sourced them as .

The standard approach seems to be to have one component per type of graph. Each component usually requires you to either pass it lots of properties, which determine everything about how the graph displays – whether to show the axes, data for the chart legend, and of course data…

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