Learn AngularJS With Some Great Books

Learn AngularJS With Some Great Books

  • Today we’re covering some AngularJS books that can get you started on your path to learning how to design single-page web applications using AngularJS.
  • While the code examples in books can sometimes become outdated, books are still valuable because they go over and explain the major concepts (directives, services, factories, unit testing, etc.) that you need when developing an AngularJS web app.
  • The guides on the AngularJS website are good starting points but I find that a book can go into much more detail and provide more examples that fully explore each area of the AngularJS framework.
  • What I really like about this book, aside from the extensive unit tests/examples, are the easy to understand explanations of core AngularJS concepts.
  • Buy Mastering Web Application Development with AngularJS now

    Here’s an example of a good book that has outdated code examples.

Great AngularJS books from Apress, Packt and O’Reilly. How to learn Angular with great books.

@rudolf_olah: Learn AngularJS With Some Great Books

Today we’re covering some AngularJS books that can get you started on your path to learning how to design single-page web applications using AngularJS. While the code examples in books can sometimes become outdated, books are still valuable because they go over and explain the major concepts (directives, services, factories, unit testing, etc.) that you need when developing an AngularJS web app.

The guides on the AngularJS website are good starting points but I find that a book can go into much more detail and provide more examples that fully explore each area of the AngularJS framework. Physical books also serve as a nice break from the screen and when written well, they let you mentally figure out what the code examples will do.

This book was recently published and has up-to-date code examples. It’s a heavy book and covers everything: directives, services, controllers. It has a nice dedicated section for defining AngularJS services and providers. It’s fantastic.

Here’s an excerpt from Chapter 9 – The Anatomy of an AngularJS App describing dependency injection:

“The place to start is to understand the problem DI sets out to solve. Some of the components in an AngularJS application will depend on others. In Listing 9-4, my controller needs to use the $scope component, which allows it to pass data to the view. This is an example of a dependency — my controller depends on the $scope component to perform its work.

Dependency injection simplifies the process of dealing with dependencies — known as resolving a dependency — between components. Without DI, I would have to locate $scope myself somehow, probably using global variables. It would work, but it wouldn’t be as simple as the AngularJS technique.

As you can see, the explanation is quite clear, perfect for anyone new to AngularJS.

This book gives a great overview and walkthrough of major concepts. One thing that’s impressive is that the book has unit tests for every example. Write out the code, write the unit test and run it and you can see exactly what’s going to happen.

You can click here to see an excerpt of Chapter 5 – Creating Advanced Forms.

What I really like about this book, aside from the extensive unit tests/examples, are the easy to understand explanations of core AngularJS concepts. For example, the $digest cycle and when you need to use the $apply method on scopes. If you understand them, you can improve the performance of your web app and you can avoid common mistakes.

Here’s an excerpt from Chapter 11 – Writing Robust AngularJS Web Applications, page 294:

“The idea behind AngularJS model-changes tracking mechanism is based on the observation that at the end of the day, there is a finte (and rather small) number of situations where models can change. Those include:

Indeed if none of the earlier events take place (user is not interacting with a page, no XHR calls have finished, no timers firing) there is no point in monitoring the model for changes. There is simply nothing going on for a given page, the model isn’t changing, so there is no reason to re-render the DOM.

AngularJS starts its model-observing machinery if and only if it is explicitly told to do so. To bring this sophisticated mechanism to life, we need to execute the $apply method on a scope object.”

As you can see, the explanation is clear and the book is full of gems like this.

Here’s an example of a good book that has outdated code examples. I would recommend getting this as a reference. This book is a solid reference that explains the major concepts so that you can apply them on your own.

You can click here to download a free sampler of O’Reilly AngularJS – Chapter 1.

I hope that they release a 2nd edition of the book with updated examples because O’Reilly books are usually pretty good.

AngularJS Books

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