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Michael Brooks’s answer to Why is AngularJS not in the discussion with React.js and Vue.js during the WordPress client’s site implementation?

  • When they were building version 2 of Angular, I’m pretty sure they promised it would be backwards compatible and everyone would be able to migrate away from 1.
  • They decided that a whole new rewrite was the best option and the API would be completely different from version 1.
  • This has therefore created a massive divide in the Angular community and people who used version 1 are either still angrily developing for that version, or have moved away and now use React or Vue.
  • Therefore, when you upgrade to this new major version you can use your old code and code in the exact same way you’re used to.
  • Vue on the other hand is becoming hugely popular in the JS dev community because everyone loves working with it’s API.

I’m not an Angular user, but I guess it’s because of the bad rep that the devs at Angular have received. They built version 1 with a very ugly API compared to React and Vue. When they were building version 2 of Angular, I’m pretty sure they promised it would be backwards compatible and everyone would be able to migrate away from 1.

@Mike_D_Brooks: My answer to Why is AngularJS not in the discussion with React.js and Vue.js during the WordPress client’s site imp…

Michael Brooks’s answer to Why is AngularJS not in the discussion with React.js and Vue.js during the WordPress client’s site implementation? – Quora

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I’m not an Angular user, but I guess it’s because of the bad rep that the devs at Angular have received. They built version 1 with a very ugly API compared to React and Vue. When they were building version 2 of Angular, I’m pretty sure they promised it would be backwards compatible and everyone would be able to migrate away from 1.

This was most definitely not the case when version 2 came out. They decided that a whole new rewrite was the best option and the API would be completely different from version 1. This caused a lot of upset as people who invested so much time and money in version 1 either had to just stick with it until their project got a rewrite, or invest even more time and money into migrating over to version 2.

Because of this, new developers are weary about whether to use Angular or not, because what’s to say this couldn’t happen in the future. This has therefore created a massive divide in the Angular community and people who used version 1 are either still angrily developing for that version, or have moved away and now use React or Vue.

Now, take a look at how React handles their upgrades. The next release which was tagged Fibre is a complete rewrite which is supposed to cut speed load times and compile time massively, but they haven’t changed the API in any major way. Therefore, when you upgrade to this new major version you can use your old code and code in the exact same way you’re used to.

Vue on the other hand is becoming hugely popular in the JS dev community because everyone loves working with it’s API. I haven’t used it myself yet, but I would love to find a moment and get my hands on it. Again, with the upgrades, I’m pretty sure they make migrating as easily as possible which is more bonus points.

After all this, would you rather the community builds something that uses tools which are easy to upgrade and maintain, or would you use tools where you’re not sure where they are heading and wonder if upgrading and maintaining will be a pain?

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Michael Brooks’s answer to Why is AngularJS not in the discussion with React.js and Vue.js during the WordPress client’s site implementation?

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