Node.js in Practice: Alex R. Young, Marc Harter: 9781617290930: Amazon: Books

  • Then they quickly recommend that Node newcomers should put this book aside for now and read another good, but more basic, how-to book first: Node.js in Action.
  • In Node.js in Practice, the learning curve can start getting steep fairly quickly, especially for those of us who have worked somewhat superficially with Node in web projects that also involve other software (such as the MEAN stack: MongoDB, Express and AngularJS, plus Node).
  • Part One focuses on “Node’s core fundamentals” and “what’s possible using only Node’s core modules (no third-party modules).”
  • Part Three, meanwhile, emphasizes “creating your own Node modules in a straightforward manner that ties in all kinds of ways to use npm commands for packaging, running, testing, benchmarking, and sharing modules.
  • The book offers “115 techniques…each module covering a specific Node.js topic or task, and each divided into practical Problem/Solution/Discussion sections.”

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Just started into this book, as a seasoned developer in other languages, and so opened up my WebStorm evaluation editor and started coding in Chapter 1, the example in the book. I had an issue getting it going, and admittedly am a bit light in my Javascript method inheritence, so when I got an error running the node program, and being unsure of myself, I was stuck.

It was very refreshing to look in the front of the book, find the information about the Google blog for the book and be able to post a message to ask for help. What really was impressive, is to have the author Alex get back to me within a few hours. Wow!

(The problem was “my bad”, and was an obvious omission/mistake on my part in entering the code), the code printed in the book was correct.

Fixed it, and the example worked like a charm. Chapter 1, behind me I am

looking forward to working my way through the rest of the text, and learned a lot (like about streams in NodeJS) just by typing int the first example.

This is not a beginner’s book, but for me, this is a great way to get your hands on the code, quickly and I learn best by keying in code and gaining confidence and stepping through code (versus just reading). Thanks Alex!

Good examples and explanation.

I have read many Node books, with satisfaction, but they tended to direct their coverage toward UI and database frameworks and applications. This new book concentrates on Node itself, taking a deeper dive with a narrower focus.

This is an intermediate level book, for those with some Node experience, who are ready to learn about the Node core that is used as the basis of the more familiar frameworks and libraries the application developer normally encounters.

The examples are short (my favorite kind), but rich with thought provoking technique that teaches idiom and leads to greater understanding of why things are done the way they are in quality Node modules.

This book will appeal to systems software engineers who will quickly recognize Node as an abstraction on top of Unix, designed to simplify asynchronous use of sockets and other system services. If you read and study this book carefully, you will be prepared to design and develop Node applications and library modules that are useful far beyond stock in trade UI and database applications.

The book does venture into Express, outside the Node core, but in a useful, limited fashion that concentrates on the use of Node and Express to develop REST APIs. This is a very common use case for Node that needs more real world coverage and exposition of best practices.

Node.js in Practice is my new favorite Node book. Highly recommended.

I have had a long-term, love-ignore relationship with Node.js. I have taken Node classes, read Node books, and tinkered with Node programming both on Windows and Linux machines. Sometimes I have loved working with Node.js. Other times, I have ignored it for months at a stretch while I rush around trying out other choices and development distractions.

Node.js in Practice is aimed at intermediate Node.js programmers and even advanced Node.js programmers. There is some awareness that beginners also may be reading this book. So the authors start by explaining Node from the standpoint of “what it is, how it works, and why it’s something you can’t live without.” Then they quickly recommend that Node newcomers should put this book aside for now and read another good, but more basic, how-to book first: Node.js in Action.

In Node.js in Practice, the learning curve can start getting steep fairly quickly, especially for those of us who have worked somewhat superficially with Node in web projects that also involve other software (such as the MEAN stack: MongoDB, Express and AngularJS, plus Node). Fortunately, the authors, Alex Young and Marc Harter, take a very focused, three-part approach that keeps Node.js centered in the spotlight and promotes deeper understanding.

Part One focuses on “Node’s core fundamentals” and “what’s possible using only Node’s core modules (no third-party modules).” Part Two moves into “real-world development recipes” and shows how to “master four highly applicable skills–testing, web development, debugging, and running Node in production.” Some third-party modules also are introduced. Part Three, meanwhile, emphasizes “creating your own Node modules in a straightforward manner that ties in all kinds of ways to use npm commands for packaging, running, testing, benchmarking, and sharing modules. It also includes helpful tips on versioning projects effectively.”

The book offers “115 techniques…each module covering a specific Node.js topic or task, and each divided into practical Problem/Solution/Discussion sections.” I really like this approach, and the illustrated discussions that accompany each short code example have been especially helpful for me.

It has been a pleasure to upgrade to the latest version of Node.js recently and reconnect with it by using this new book. Despite my previous experience with Node.js, I see that I still have a lot to learn! My thanks to Manning for providing a review copy of Node.js in Practice.

Node.js in Practice: Alex R. Young, Marc Harter: 9781617290930: Amazon: Books

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